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Daylight Savings

How to Sleep Better in the Fall

The season of pumpkin lattés, football, and cozy sweaters can mean months of poor sleep for some people. While fall’s cool nights provide a nice bedtime break from summer’s hot and humid evenings, a host of other sleep issues can crop up during this time of year and disrupt shuteye. But autumn doesn’t need to leave you fatigued and frustrated—just follow this advice. See the Light. Fall’s shorter days mean that you’re not exposed to as much sunlight. Not only can this lower your level of vitamin D, which may leave you feeling fatigued, but it can throw off your circadian rhythm, which regulates feelings of wakefulness and sleepiness. Luckily, getting plenty of sun on your…

Refresh Your Sleep This Spring

  Springtime can do a number on your sleep. Find out what to do about it. The sun is shining, the birds are chirping, and colorful buds are starting to pop from the ground. So why, when the rest of the world is so refreshed, aren’t you? For some people, spring can be a tough time of year to get a restful night’s sleep. But it doesn’t have to be. Below, check out some reasons that you might be tossing and turning during this time of year—and what you can do about it.   Sleep Stealer: Allergies How to Rest Easy: Allergies can crop up any time of year, but pollen tends to be at its peak in the spring….

Why Do We "Spring Forward" But "Fall Back" With Daylight Saving Time?

Myths, truths, and debates about switching the clocks The terms “spring forward” and “fall back” are used to describe a practice of changing standard time with the intention of  “saving” (as in, making better use of) natural light. During daylight savings time (DST), clocks are turned ahead one hour, so that the sun rises later in the morning and sets later in the evening. The change is reversed in autumn. Originally enacted in the United States as a wartime conservation effort, observance of DST became federal law in 1918. (To dispel a common myth: It was not enacted for farmers—in fact, most farmers fought for its repeal.) While it was quickly repealed after the war ended,…

How to Handle the Time Change

A few simple steps can get you back on track quickly. It happens every year, but Daylight Saving Time still manages to catch many people by surprise. Every spring, clocks are pushed forward one hour from 2:00am to 3:00am to start Daylight Saving Time. And every fall, they are dropped back an hour (2:00am becomes 1:00am) to go into Standard Time. Almost everyone in the U.S. springs forward on the second Sunday in March and falls back on the first Sunday in November. That means that the second Monday in March is likely going to be a day when most people will feel exhausted, thanks to a way-too-early-seeming wake-up call. In fact, the average person…

Does Everyone Observe Daylight Saving Time?

Who’s turning the clocks back (or springing forward) with you? “Spring forward” and “fall back” are seasonal markers for most parts of the country—but not all. Daylight Saving Time is not observed in Hawaii or Arizona (with the exception of the Navajo Nation), and it’s also skipped in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. When it comes to the rest of the world, it’s a mix. In fact, only about 70 percent of countries follow Daylight Savings Time. Here’s a rundown of the countries that choose not to mess with their clocks. Much of the Tropics: Many countries along and below the equator don’t participate in Daylight Savings Time. Due to their location, the daylight…