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Sleep Problems & Disorders

Should I Visit a Sleep Clinic?

Find out whether or not a sleep clinic may help you fix your slumber problems. You’ve tried warm milk, soothing music, an earlier bedtime, a new mattress, melatonin…the list goes on and on, but you’re still staring at the ceiling every night unable to sleep. Before you resign yourself to a life of counting sheep, know that a sleep clinic could help you get the rest you need. What Is a Sleep Clinic? Many sleep disorders such as sleep apnea and insomnia can be difficult to pinpoint while you’re awake, so doctors use sleep clinics to monitor patients overnight. While most sleep studies are set up to resemble private hotel rooms (to…

What is Narcolepsy?

This disorder involves a lot more than falling asleep in the middle of a sentence. Narcolepsy, which affects about one in 2,000 people, is a sleep disorder that causes a person to instantly fall into a deep sleep at any time, even in the middle of an activity. Those unplanned sleep attacks aren’t very long—usually just a few seconds to a few minutes—but they can have a huge impact on a person’s quality of life. Imagine falling asleep in the middle of chatting with your boss, eating dinner with your family, or driving a car. It’s not only embarrassing, it’s dangerous. On top…

Interrupted Sleep: What Happens To Your Body

Waking up throughout the night does a lot more than make you exhausted. There are lots of reasons why you might spend a restless night waking up every few hours, checking the clock, and feeling disappointed that it’s still nowhere near morning. Maybe there’s a new baby who has to be fed regularly, a sick dog who needs frequent trips to the backyard, neighbors who have rocking parties, or just a racing brain that makes staying asleep tough. Whatever the cause, you’re bound to wake up tired the next morning. But that’s not all. There are a few other ways that waking up often throughout the night affects your physical and mental health. Your Brain Isn’t…

How to Prevent Neck Pain While Sleeping

Check to see if you’re making one of these ouch-inducing bedtime mistakes. Neck pain can be a real, well, pain in the neck. While some causes—like the wear and tear of aging, arthritis, or even an injury like a slipped disk—may be out of your control, many common triggers are things that you can control, like the way you’re hitting the hay at night. Check out if something on the following list is causing that crick in your neck. Your Pillow A pillow is supposed to position your head so that it’s in a healthy, neutral position. That means that your nose is in line with the center of your body, or your spine. If you…

Why Do Some Kids Wet the Bed?

The reasons why nighttime accidents occur may surprise you! If you’re the parent of a bedwetter, you’re likely all too familiar with orchestrating middle-of-the-night pajama changes and dragging heaping loads of soggy sheets to the laundry machine. You’ve also probably wondered more than once whether the nighttime accidents will ever end. The good news: Odds are, they will! While15 percent of children wet the bed at age five, less than five percent will still be having accidents by ages eight to 11. (In rare cases, bedwetting can continue into the teen years and adulthood, and if it does, that’s a signal to talk to a doctor, because it could by a symptom of an underlying…

What Causes Nightmares?

Five surprising reasons for your dark dreams If you had hoped to grow out of your nightmare stage, but find that you suffer from them as an adult, too, you’re not alone. While nightmares are more common among kids, 50 percent of adults have nightmares. These frightening, too-realistic dreams can leave you feeling rattled, and in more severe cases, they can cause sleep deprivation—which is linked to heart disease, obesity, and depression. There are a number of reasons why you may have nightmares, including: Eating Before Bed: A pre-bedtime snack can increase your metabolism, which causes the brain to become more active and can possibly lead to nightmares. If you notice that you have…

What is Insufficient Sleep?

How to tell if you’re dealing with insufficient sleep syndrome Nearly 30 percent of adults get less than six hours of sleep per night, on average (when most should be getting more like seven to nine). Regularly failing to get enough sleep at night is known as insufficient sleep syndrome, and it can be very hazardous to your health. How And When Insufficient Sleep Happens Certain conditions like insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea can lead to insufficient sleep syndrome, but, in some cases, behavior is to blame, such as taking on shift work, checking a few extra emails at 11:00pm or staying up late to finish a movie. Two percent of people suffer from behavior-induced insufficient…

What is Sleep Apnea?

Learn the signs that may point to this condition.   Have you ever woken up in the middle of the night gasping for air? Does your partner complain about your incessant, loud snoring? Do you feel more tired in the morning than when you went to bed? Then you could be one of the 18 million American adults who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). OSA is a condition in which the upper passages of your airways close up, cutting off your oxygen and interrupting your breathing until you wake up and start breathing again. The only way to confirm whether you have sleep apnea is to take a sleep test, where experts record what happens while…

What Is A Cpap Machine?

Everything you need to know about this sleep apnea treatment.   After being diagnosed with sleep apnea, there’s a chance that your doctor may give you a CPAP machine as a form of treatment. It’s a little more unusual than, say, popping a pill, so understanding how it works may answer any questions that you might have and/or ease any concerns. Q: What is a CPAP Machine? A: CPAP stands for continuous positive airway pressure. The machines help people with sleep apnea breathe more easily and regularly every night while they are sleeping. A CPAP machine increases the air pressure in your throat to prevent your airway from collapsing when you inhale. It also decreases snoring (which…

Improve Your Snoring …and Reduce Your Chances of Sleeping on the Couch

  Snoring is common, especially as we get older. While it rarely bothers the actual snorer, it can be a huge annoyance to the person sound asleep next to you. Sure, sleeping in separate rooms is one solution, but let’s explore a few other options first:  Make a lifestyle change: That’s right – drinking alcohol, smoking, and taking muscle relaxants or sedative medications can worsen snoring. Try abstaining for a few days and see if you notice any improvement.  Try a new sleeping position: For all of you back sleepers – unfortunately, you are more prone to snoring. There is an array of positioning devices available to help you stay off your back. For those interested in…